A B C G I L M N O P S T
CA CI CL CO CU

Cinnamon

 
L.Cinnamomum verum
HindiDalchini (दालचिनी)
BengaliDarchini (দারুচিনি)
TamilAttai, Lavangampattai, Karuvappattai
FarsiDarchin (دارچین)
Ind.Kayu Manis , Cassia Vera
MalayalamKarugapatta
TeleguDalchina Chakka
SinhalaKurundu
GujrathiTaj
UrduDarchini (दालचीनी دارچینی)
Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum, synonym C. zeylanicum) is a small evergreen tree belonging to the family Lauraceae, native to Sri Lanka, or the spice obtained from the tree's bark. It is often confused with other similar species and the similar spices derived from them, such as Cassia and Cinnamomum burmannii, which are often called cinnamon too. The name cinnamon comes from Greek kinnámōmon, itself ultimately from Phoenician. The botanical name for the spice—Cinnamomum zeylanicum—is derived from Sri Lanka's former name, Ceylon. In Marathi, it is known as "DalChini (दालचिनी)". In Bengali, it is called "Darchini" (দারুচিনি). In Telugu, it is called Dalchina Chakka, Chakka meaning bark or wood. In Sanskrit cinnamon is known as tvak or dārusitā. In Urdu, Hindi, and Hindustani cinnamon is called darchini (दालचीनी دارچینی), in Assamese it is called alseni, and in Gujarati taj. In Farsi (Persian), it is called darchin (دارچین). In Indonesia, where it is cultivated in Java and Sumatra, it is called kayu manis and sometimes cassia vera, the "real' cassia. In Sri Lanka, in the original Sinhala, cinnamon is known as kurundu, recorded in English in the 17th century as Korunda.In Malayalam, karugapatta and in Tamil pattai or lavangampattai or karuvappattai. In Arabic it is called qerfa (قرفة).
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnamon
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